The biggest video game of the year isn't making any fans in Cuba's government. Here's why...

About 5.6 million people bought Call of Duty: Black Ops when it went on sale earlier this week. The first-person shooter had a bigger opening than any movie, any video game, any... book. But not everyone was delighted about the game's exploration of the 1960s Cold War.

The opening level of the game sends a special ops team onto the island nation during the Bay of Pigs invasion to take down Fidel Castro. The outcome of this particular mission likely isn't as relevant to the Cuban government as the mission itself, which was too much for the state-run news agencies to handle.

Allowing gamers to take a virtual run at what clandestine ops have been trying to do for half a century "stimulates sociopathic attitudes in North American children and adolescents," they say.

So what's the big deal? Let's go to the tape... unless you're worried about spoilers. You can find the embedable version here.

If that's not enough Fidel for you, check out how he fares against zombies.

Also check out our take on this whole "controversy."