The GameCube Made Shigeru Miyamoto "Very Sad"

Nintendo's Senior Managing Director Shigeru Miyamoto was not a happy man during the GameCube era. The creator of Link and Mario describes Nintendo's fourth-generation console entry as a time of "dilemma."

Miyamoto says in a new Famitsu interview, by way of 1UP, that during the Nintendo 64 and GameCube lifespans, Nintendo was following in the path of other, more successful competitors.

"I was endlessly fascinated with 3D worlds, but what with all the issues I had to tinker with in terms of rendering and processing speed, it got to the point where I didn't know who was making the games any longer," Miyamoto said.

That Nintendo had failed to capture the imagination of the gaming public the way that Sony had during the post-Super Nintendo era made for one unhappy Miyamoto.

"If Nintendo's games fail to stand out as games that aren't made that way proliferate, then it shows that the creation process is for nothing, which made me very sad," Miyamoto explained. "That was especially obvious during the GameCube era; Nintendo titles were hardly even discussed by the [non-gaming] general public back then."

It was the GameCube's cooler reception that led Nintendo's engineers to think about "starting over from scratch," revisiting NES titles for the Game Boy Advance and designing the Nintendo DS with two (initially confounding) screens. Then, well, you know what happened.

Hey, Shigeru, I think we all felt a little bad during the GameCube era. I mean, I paid full price for Luigi's Mansion. Try going through that sometime.

Miyamoto "Very Sad" During GameCube Era [1UP]