Nintendo: Children Afraid Of Math, Math Trainer Can Help

A survey conducted on behalf of Nintendo to help market Personal Trainer: Math for the DS finds that one in five children believe they're more likely to become famous than excel at math.

The study, conducted by Wakefield Research on Nintendo's behalf, basically comes to the conclusion that about 20% of the nation's school children could really use a copy of Personal Trainer: Math, the fun and easy way to overcome the math anxiety that's trodding on the toes of kids around the country. 18 percent called math "boring." Another 13 percent called it "torture." What happened to the magic of learning? Apparently Nintendo has found it.

“Personal Trainer: Math provides a fun antidote for math anxiety,” said Cammie Dunaway, Nintendo of America’s executive vice president of Sales & Marketing. “People can keep their math skills sharp while tracking their progress every day to see how they improve.”

All marketing cynicism aside, I wholly approve of titles like Personal Trainer: Math. When your product is in the hands of some many people around the world, providing tools to help said people improve themselves is a very responsible thing to do. Check out the release below for more marketing and math anxiety facts!

One in Five Kids Think Fame is More Likely Than Math Proficiency
Personal Trainer: Math for Nintendo DS Turns Learning Into a Game

REDMOND, Wash.—(BUSINESS WIRE)—A new survey, conducted by Wakefield Research for Nintendo, confirms that math anxiety is alive and well among U.S. kids. In fact, of 400 children surveyed, one in five believe that they are more likely to grow up to become a professional athlete, actor or singer than they are to get A’s and B’s in math next year. Other results of the survey conducted Dec. 12-23, 2008, include:

More than one-third of kids surveyed say that math is their most difficult subject.
Nearly one-third of kids have very negative feelings about math: 18 percent called it “boring,” while 13 percent actually called it “torture.”
86 percent of parents surveyed say that math is important to their careers, even though more than half of them admitted they thought they’d never need the math they learned in school.
These results demonstrate that math remains perceived as a difficult but important skill. Building on its legacy of training brains and getting people moving with fitness games, Nintendo introduces Personal Trainer™: Math, new software for Nintendo DS™ that provides a fun and rewarding way for people to improve their basic math abilities.

“Personal Trainer: Math provides a fun antidote for math anxiety,” said Cammie Dunaway, Nintendo of America’s executive vice president of Sales & Marketing. “People can keep their math skills sharp while tracking their progress every day to see how they improve.”

Personal Trainer: Math includes 40 fast-paced exercises, from basic addition and multiplication to more extensive multiplication tables and calculation ladders. Daily math drills keep skills sharp, while attendance records provide ways for users to see how they improve week to week and month to month. The Nintendo DS touch screen interface allows users to input their answers quickly and easily. Using wireless DS Download Play, up to 16 players can compete to finish their problems with the fastest time, even if only one player has a game card.

Personal Trainer: Math marks the second in Nintendo’s Personal Trainer series of titles that are designed to help people enrich their lives in fun and creative ways. Personal Trainer: Cooking already has turned thousands of Nintendo DS owners into budding chefs.

For more information about Personal Trainer: Math, visit www.PersonalTrainerMath.com.