So, some guys cracked the PS3's copy protection security wide open. One of them is a "celebrity". The others are complete unknowns. So unknown that Sony can't find them, meaning it can't take them to court.

In an attempt to track them ("them" being the fail0verflow team) down, Sony earlier this week tried to get permission to issue subpoenas, demanding sites like Google and PayPal hand over personal and contact information on all the hackers.

It sounded a little much, and US District Judge the Honorable Susan Illston agrees, denying Sony's attempts at issuing those subpoenas.

While this will only buy the hackers time - it's not like they'll stay secret/hidden forever - it may be enough time to cut the phone lines, pack their best Hawaiin shirts and head for a country whose extradition laws are...lax.

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SCEA vs. Hotz: Judge Denies Sony's Request for Expedited Discovery [PSX-Scene]