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"We Need To Go Beyond Traditional Square Enix"

Illustration for article titled We Need To Go Beyond Traditional Square Enix

Square Enix honcho Yoichi Wada (above, left) is worried. Western game companies are doing really well! Meaning that competition is getting harder. Yet, Wada hopes to capitalize on the Western market, aiming to increase the ratio of overseas sales from its current 50 percent to 80 percent in the next three years. According to the exec:

We face competition not only from Japanese videogame companies but from game companies worldwide. We also see some new players from outside the videogame industry coming in... Economies of scale and breadth of scope is getting important. It may be a business alliance or it may be us taking a stake in others, but we need to go beyond traditional Square Enix.

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That business alliance sounds nice and all. But, how about stop calling everything Final Fantasy? Or make things other than RPGs? Or if you are going to make RPGs, why not make the games people have been asking for for the past decade?

Yoichi Talks [Reuters] [Pic]

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DISCUSSION

@seafisch: Anorexic hourglass figures is an oxymoron but it best describes what I think of Nomura's current take on character designs. His characters, both male and female are extremely skinny in the arms and legs so that they look almost skeletal. At the same time, these characters somehow manage to have broad shoulders and hips with a tiny waist.

Shiki from "The World Ends with You" is a prime example. Many people would pick up on her absurd proportions and quickly label her as "fat". To me though, the skeletal arms and oddly sized hips make her look like a starving child from a third world country. Children of famine tend to have skeletal frames with a distended stomach. You can even see the beginnings of this "art style" in Kingdom Hearts 2 with the members of Organization XIII.