UFC fighters live-streaming on Twitch, this is a thing that happens now. Quinton ‘Rampage’ Jackson is probably most successful, given his penchant for drunk dialing former opponents and talking shit to them live.

Demetrious ‘Mighty Mouse’ Johnson — the current UFC Flyweight champion and arguably the best pound-for-pound fighter on the planet — runs a close second.



And the weirdest thing just happened during his livestream.

First, some context: the UFC has a drug problem. Plenty of fighters are competing using performance enhancing drugs. Ask fighters what percentage of their opponents are on the juice? Most estimates tend to run between 50% and 80%.

So yeah, the UFC has a big drug problem. And it’s a problem they are trying to fix. That’s why they’re paying the United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) a ton of money to randomly drug test UFC fighters when they least expect it. Previously UFC fighters only had to worry about being tested on fight night; which left them with plenty of time to cycle off HGH, steroids or whatever weird laxatives they were using to help them cut weight.

Now? Fighters can expect to have USADA barge down their door at any time they choose and in 2016 USADA has dialled things up a notch. Dozens of fighters have been tweeting pics, instagrams of them being blood and urine tested in their homes at all hours in the morning.


Usually USADA drags fighters out of their beds, but this time? Even worse.

USADA literally barged in on Mighty Mouse whilst he was playing Bloodborne. Not only was he playing Bloodborne he was live-streaming Bloodborne on Twitch.



Which is incredible, considering the majority of his stream chat was already talking about the drug testing, and how hilarious it would be if Mighty Mouse was randomly tested during the stream.

And then it happened. A knock on the door. USADA, here to test the champ. “Knocking on the door like the police,” as Mighty Mouse described it.

Unreal. You can watch it happening in the video above.

This post originally appeared on Kotaku Australia, where Mark Serrels is the Editor. You can follow him on Twitter if you’re into that sort of thing.