This morning, I popped Tales of Berseria into my PlayStation 4 and was yet again greeted with the wonderful news that my system is out of space.

Maybe you can relate. Maybe you play a fair number of PS4 games and have also felt that twang of mild irritation when you pop in a brand new disc, eager to play something new, only to be told that “There is not enough free space in system storage,” which is basically the PlayStation’s way of telling you to fuck off. Maybe it makes you wistful for the good old days. Maybe it makes you nostalgic for the era when all you had to do to play a video game was put it in the system and maybe blow on the cartridge a couple of times.

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Now, though! Now playing video games is an exercise in project management. Thanks to the OG PS4's pitiful 500 GB hard drive, which seemed quaint in 2013 but feels downright old-fashioned today, inserting a new disc means playing a game called “What Will I Delete Today?” Tales of Berseria, for example, wanted an extra 12 GB for whatever it needed to install on my system. I had 12 GB free, but to the PlayStation 4 that didn’t seem to matter, so again I went into system storage management and said goodbye to a bunch of other games.

You might think that this wouldn’t be a problem if you only buy physical games, but you’d be wrong. Watch Dogs 2, which I have on disc, still takes up roughly 27 gigabytes. Skyrim is another 21 GB and Final Fantasy XIV occupies a whopping 44 GB, even though they all still require discs to play. Add in save files, patches, and video capture, and you can see how 500 GB disappears quickly, especially with games like Destiny that require you to have roughly 50 spare GB just to download an update.

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I mean, sure. Our new digital future has led to all sorts of wonderful possibilities for video games. This is very much a First-World Problem. BUT STILL FUCK THAT MESSAGE.