Did Capcom Know Its Deaf Composer Apparently Isn't Deaf?

Mamoru Samuragoch was previously known as "Japan's Beethoven." Now, he's being called the country's biggest music fraud. And according to one insider, a certain game company knew.

Last week, Samuragoch* revealed that he used a ghost composer to create music. Samuragoch is known for works like "Symphony No.1 Hiroshima" as well as the scores for the DualShock version of Resident Evil Director's Cut and Onimusha.

The ghost writer, a music professor named Takashi Niigaki, revealed that he composed songs for Samuragoch for over 18 years and that Samuragoch apparently isn't deaf. In a written apology, Samuragoch now says he can hear somewhat.

"In recent years I have started to be able to hear a little bit more than before... since about three years ago I can hear words if people speak clearly and slowly into my ears," Samuragochi wrote. "It is true that I received a certificate proving I had a hearing disorder and that I couldn't hear anything up until three years ago." There is doubt over this in Japan.

According to Yahoo News, the expert medical opinion is that regaining one's hearing after being completely deaf would be "miracle"."

Did Capcom Know Its Deaf Composer Apparently Isn't Deaf?

According to Nippon TV, an individual connected to a Japanese game developer is quoted as saying, "As for Mamoru Samuragoch being able to hear, it was an unspoken understanding among everyone in the company."

At that time, the game insider says Samuragoch was said to be "completely deaf," but after a game presentation, he was allegedly saying what sounds were too low and too high. Apparently, even when his back was to the company's staff, Samuragoch would turn his head normally.

Did Capcom Know Its Deaf Composer Apparently Isn't Deaf?

Nippon TV did not mention the name of the game company. Samuragoch is credited with only on two game soundtracks, both of which are mentioned above. Both of which were released by Capcom—something that hasn't escaped online commenters in Japan.

"Capcom, lol," wrote one. "This is no good," wrote another.

Kotaku is following up with Capcom and will update this story should it comment.

Update: Capcom issued Kotaku the following statement: "We at Capcom were truly surprised by Samuragochi's recent admission. However, as both soundtracks involved are no longer in circulation, we have no plans to take action of any kind."

*Birthname: Mamoru Samuragochi

ゲーム会社関係者「佐村河内氏の耳が聞こえているのは社内では皆が知っている暗黙の了解だった」これカプコン・・・ [Otakomu]

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