This Week in the Business: 'After These Next Consoles, I Don't Think There'll Be Any More'S

What's happened in the business of video games this past week ...

QUOTE | "After these next Sony and Microsoft consoles I don't think there'll be any more."—Peter Relan, co-founder of cloud gaming startup Agawi, talking about the past, present and the future of cloud gaming.

QUOTE | "You have to be willing to be seen as a monomaniacal narcissist."—Tim Schafer of Double Fine, along with other big-name developers, talking about what fame means to them.

STAT | 66,000—Number of Wii U units sold in the US in February, up 45 percent from last month; this compares to the 302,000 Xbox 360s sold and the 263,000 PS3s sold that same month.

QUOTE | "Come hell or high water, we're shipping this thing, and it will be the best our blood, sweat and tears can make it."—Jordan Weisman, head of Harebrained Schemes, talking about the Shadowrun Returns project.

QUOTE | "Predictable and lazy tabloid associations between computer games and serial killings continue."—Adam Keal, PR professional, talking about why games still aren't media mainstream.

STAT | 50 percent—Amount Valve's business has increased over the last year, according to Gabe Newell; he said "There's this sort of insatiable desire for gaming right now" in the same interview.

QUOTE | "You can't let [your audience] design the game, necessarily, but ignore them at your peril." - Mike Goslin, general manager of Rebel Entertainment, talking about how audience input is changing its free-to-play game Dungeon Rampage.

STAT | 25 percent —Amount retail sales of video game hardware and software dropped in the US in February compared to last year; hardware plunged 36 percent compared to last year.

QUOTE | "PC is not just another platform ... it will be more and more important in terms of maximizing the game's potential."—Marek Tyminski, CEO of City Interactive, talking about his studio's plans for development following Sniper: Ghost Warrior 2.

STAT | 100 million—Number of games downloaded over Line, the Japanese mobile messaging app; there are only 16 different games available to choose from.


This Week in the Business courtesy of GamesIndustry International
(Image from Shutterstock)