There's a movement afoot in Germany to hold a mass burning of "killerspiele,"—their word for violent video games—in front of the Reichstag in Berlin on Jan. 27. Leni Riefenstahl died eight years ago, so if this really happens, someone else will have to film it.

[Update] As has been pointed out by many, this "movement" is most likely a hoax, and the idea of a public burning of video games in Germany, not that it ever had popular support, is unlikely ever to come to pass.

The remainder of the original post follows.

It's hard to tell what kind of popular support this really has beyond the clowns running it. But in addition to the black self-parody of a bunch of Germans burning shit in front of the Reichstag, this is remarkable because the demonstration seems to be organized by German gamers, and not the usual suspects. GameOasis, a German gaming interest site, discovered the protest organization within a Google group for computer games. Translated, the call to action cites the Dec. 14 massacre at Newtown, Conn., and seems to be an effort by some gamers to distance themselves and their lifestyle from some of the more violent fare available.

What's more, there's a group down in Vienna planning a burn of its own, conveniently timing it two days after the one up in Berlin. [Correction:] I misread the translation. The Austrians are against the German action, and jokingly proposed to burn the Berlin demonstrators.

Germany is extremely serious about banning anything that conjures up memories of its Nazi past—video games like Wolfenstein's reboot have been pulled simply for the stray appearance of a swastika. I'm a little surprised that anything remotely resembling a book burning, particularly in front of the Reichstag, isn't also illegal as hell there.

Öffentliche Killerspielverbrennung am 27.1.2013 in Berlin vor dem Reichstag! [GamingOasis. h/t Michael M.]