See The Room That Ate Ms. Pac-Man and Three Other One-of-a-Kind Video Game Experiences Right HereS

Proof that video games are art isn't just on the screen. Sometimes it can be right in front of you, in the form of an arcade classic that swallows a whole room or tricked-out gloves that let you throw a Street Fighter fireball.

The video game art that viewers saw at the recent Babycastles Summit—along with a controversial hacked NES game that tackled racism and a Guitar Hero sequel that never happened— wasn't just manifested in button presses. It merged the physical and virtual worlds of play in a series of exhibits that sprang from the mind Katamari Damacy creator Keita Takahashi. In case you missed out on seeing these wonderful creations last week, here's a handy collection of all the posts where we showcased them.


See The Room That Ate Ms. Pac-Man and Three Other One-of-a-Kind Video Game Experiences Right Here

This Extraordinary Version of Ms. Pac-Man Fills an Entire Room.

It's one thing for a video game to be called immersive when you're staring at a single screen in one direction. But when you're sitting in a room surrounded by power pellets and aggressive ghosts of Ms. More »


See The Room That Ate Ms. Pac-Man and Three Other One-of-a-Kind Video Game Experiences Right Here

Here's How to Throw a Hadouken—in Real Life

Babycastles, the video games arts collective, is back in New York, teaming with Katamari Damacy creator Keita Takahashi to deliver interpretations of Mario Bros., Ms. More »


See The Room That Ate Ms. Pac-Man and Three Other One-of-a-Kind Video Game Experiences Right Here

Hi There, Ridiculously Enormous Two-Person Mario Bros. Controller

More weird riffs on classic video games from the New York City gaming collective Babycastles and Katamari Damacy dreamer Keita Takahashi. We showed you their unusual takes on Ms. More »


See The Room That Ate Ms. Pac-Man and Three Other One-of-a-Kind Video Game Experiences Right Here

You Have To Run From Room to Room (In Real Life) To Play This Arcade Game

Imagine a Defender-style video game where you had to jog across the entire floor of a building to play it. No, wait; don't imagine that. One Japanese-born game designer already did. More »