This week, I've been sharing a few short videos to give a sense of what Saints Row: The Third is all about. We've seen a chaotic way to start your day, how to customize your radio stations, and how fun the character creator is, especially with The Zombie Option. For the last video of the week, I wanted to show something a little different.

Fair warning—this is something that happens unexpectedly midway through the game's story, and it is fun to experience it without knowing about it firsthand. That said, there are so many funny surprises and one-off gags in Saints Row: The Third that seeing this one ahead of time won't ruin too much. But I'll discuss it a little bit here, so if you'd like to remain completely unspoiled, read no further.

Yep, Saints Row: The Third becomes the latest game to insert a text adventure into the works. It's a little bit like what Nier did (though shorter and played for laughs), and similar to Black Ops' Zork easter-egg. But it's original content, and much more of a joke than a real bit of gameplay. And of course, it's all done with Saints Row: The Third's signature stupid-yet-funny style.

Right there in the middle of an (admittedly weird, even for SR3) gunfight, the player gets sucked straight into a text-adventure game, which they have to "beat" before they can proceed. The joke works on a few levels, partly due to the utterly arbitrary nature of the game's difficulty, and partly due to your own character's increasing anger at those design decisions. Also, the game-in-a-game is called Dragons and Tears: Part 1 of The Spiraling Darkness Trilogy. Which, ha.

This sort of bizarre one-off is the kind of thing that Saints Row: The Third does with impressive regularity. (In fact, I'm not so sure about that headline, now that I think about it—there are plenty of gags in the game that are much more out-there than a text adventure.) I'd love to hear what this part sounds like with the other voices… how exactly would a zombie angrily ask, "Then why even mention the bloody hole?"

Woah. That line reads differently out of context.


You can contact Kirk Hamilton, the author of this post, at kirk@kotaku.com. You can also find him on Twitter, Facebook, and lurking around our #tips page.