The Man Who Brought Duke Nukem Forever Back To Life Likens It To A Greasy Hamburger

Who cares if Duke Nukem Forever is "good" or not? It is at least as satisfying as a greasy burger, as catchy as a Ke$ha song or maybe as enjoyable as a performance of Spider-Man: Turn Off The Dark in which no one suffers a debilitating injury. (Or does. Which would make that superhero musical better?)

Randy Pitchford, co-founder of Gearbox Software and instrumental in seeing that Duke Nukem Forever finally shipped on a disc after more than a decade, took to Twitter this week to, well, if not defend his company's new game, then put it in the above context.

(For the record, I've not played Duke Nukem Forever, so I can't comment on its quality, but I'll trust my colleagues who label the game a "full-priced mess" and "not in a good way" offensive. I just wanted to pass on Mr. Pitchford's take.)

"With sales data, It seems like *customers* love Duke," Pitchford tweeted post DNF release. "I guess sometimes we want greasy hamburgers instead of caviar..." That's likely Randy's response to Duke Nukem Forever's critical drubbing from reviewers.

Today, he continued the comparison between Duke Nukem and less selective tastes, writing "looking at DNF for narrative depth: 'It's like Rolling Stone magazine trying to find a deep meaningful message in a Ke$ha song.'"

And on launch day, Pitchford remarked: "So... Spiderman on Broadway finally opened the same day that Duke Nukem Forever shipped. COINCIDENCE?!?" In that they were both reviewed poorly and repeatedly delayed, yes, it is a little eerie.

What's the takeaway? If you're not sick of talking about or defending the long-in-the-making Duke Nukem Forever and you're a fan of grease, pop pap and/or U2 musicals, you may have a kindred gaming soul mate in Randy Pitchford. Me? I'm just excited Gearbox is freed up to get that Borderlands sequel done.