If Cut God of War III Ending Returns as DLC, It 'Would be Free'S

We've heard that God of War III had a pretty involved postscript that had to be trimmed from the game. The game's director explained why to Kotaku Talk Radio, but said if it does come back, it'll be free.

Speaking somewhat generically to avoid spoilers, Stig Asmussen said the game originally called for so many Titan encounters - which demand a tremendous amount of time and resources - that the development team found itself nearly overwhelmed. That necessitated tough choices about what to cut, just so that the rest of the game could get the attention it needed.

"There was a pretty large thing that we chopped from the ending that I had regrets about, but then something we added at the end that helps make up for it a little bit, and helps make it more personal," Asmussen said, speaking generically to avoid spoilers. "We had titan encounters in the game, we had a pretty big one planed for the end and we got pretty far with it it, but it was just one of those deals where we just had so much."

From what he told Stephen Totilo during our podcast though, it sounds like this epilogue encounter had enough work done that it could be readied for DLC.

"As far as DLC goes, it might be something we might think about getting out there someday," Asmussen said. "The pieces are in place, the idea is written. If it's something we put out there it would be something that would be free."

Although Asmussen now says he has "no regrets" because he knew the cut was the right decision, the process by which these encounters were built sounds almost agonizing, so to let go of one so deep into its development must have been hard.

"Those things required so many resources and they're so hard to work on. It was literally the hardest thing I've ever been involved with before in my life and we just couldn't do more. We couldn't," Asmussen said. "It was to the point where we had to remove one just to invest time in the other ones that we had in the game, to get those right. We could have had more, and everything else would have suffered."

You can hear Asmussen for yourself in our podcast, available for download or iTunes subscription through this link. The relevant portion begins at the 31:10 mark.