Final Fight: Double Impact Puts You Back In the Arcade

The most impressive thing about Capcom's download ports of arcade classics Final Fight and Magic Sword aren't the gameplay, it's the frame that the game plays within.

Gamers have the option of turning on a frame for the games that turns the sides of the monitor into replicas of the old gaming guides that used to flank the sides of old arcade cabinet monitors. The view can also be tweaked to replicate the slightly outwardly distorted look of an old, cheap arcade monitor.

It's heaps better than the chintzy, sometimes generic frames applied to other arcade titles that show up on the Playstation Network and Xbox Live Arcade.

Game play for both Final Fight and Magic Sword are spot on.

The classic brawler, made by Akira Nishitani and Akira Yasuda who went on to make Street Fighter II, is a straight-forward side-scrolling arcade title packed with endearing flaws. The depth of the game remains tricky to master, you can still accidentally take out your fellow gamer when attacking bad guys and the graphics featuring an overwhelming kaleidescope of colors. And that's why I love the original and its painfully exact port.

Magic Sword has gamers work there way through a mystical tower, using found keys to free captives and recruit allies. It's been a long time since I've played the original back in its 90s arcade heyday and I can't wait to spend some time working through the game again.

What's interesting here is that Capcom gets that it is the nostalgia factor that helps to sell these games so they go the extra length to amp that up, not only capturing the feel of the gameplay and in-game graphics, but allowing you to distort the screen and add surprisingly realistic frames to the game so you feel more like you're at an arcade.

The next step needs to be sending people who download the game for the Playstation 3 or Xbox 360 in April chewed up wads of gum to stick under their controllers when playing.