In Tight Times, Gamers Dig Deep for the NeedyS

Despite a flatlined economy and a sharp downward trend in game sales, Child's Play and other gaming-themed benefits have done as well or better than in better times.

GamePro, rounding up a look at game philanthropy, spoke to Kotaku editor-in-chief Brian Crecente about this site's November event in Denver (pictured), which pulled in contributions more than 50 percent over what was raised in 2008. Crecente indicated that, when hard times hit, people are more cognizant of those in need. But gaming also seems to be something of a growth area in philanthropy as a whole.

To those people who embrace [video game] culture there are very few ways to give back to the community in a meaningful way that is also linked to gaming. Fundraisers and charities like Child's Play offer both an excellent outlet for charitable good will, but also a means to do good as a gamer, something still rare.

Fundraising totals were up nearly across the board for other major efforts, especially Desert Bus for Hope, which doubled its 2008 total with almost $140,000 raised this year.

Realizing we're starting with young causes and with figures comparatively small next to well organized, long-lived philanthropies; but I'm sure any development officer for any foundation in America would take increases of 50 or 100 percent. The three projects cited by GamePro are far from the only works, and they represent a huge opportunity for gamers to give back.

Gamers Get Less, Give More in 2009 [GamePro]