Activision Denies Wrongdoing In Scratch Suit, Backed By LA CourtS

Publisher Activision has responded to allegations that it conspired to delay rival DJ game Scratch: The Ultimate DJ by buying its competitor's developer, 7 Studios, calling those claims disingenuous and lacking in merit.

Yesterday, Genius Products and Numark Industries announced they had filed suit against Activision and Scratch developers 7 Studios for "intentional interference with contract, breach of contract and misappropriation of trade secrets." Genius and Numark claim that Activision "conspired to withhold the current version of Scratch in an effort to delay the development and release of Scratch and to gain access to proprietary technology."

According to Activision's statement, the L.A. Superior Court seems to agree, finding no evidence of any wrongdoing by the publisher and refusing to grant any restraining order against it. Activision also calls the allegations levied against it "an attempt by Genius to place blame for the game's delay, as well as to divert attention from the cash flow, liquidity and revenue challenges" facing Genius.

"By their own admission in October 2008, the game had fallen behind in production, which was well before Activision had any involvement with Genius, Numark or California 7 Studios regarding the game," the statement reads.

Activision also confirms that it has purchased 7 Studios, completing the deal on April 6th to "bolster its development capabilities." Under the ownership of Activision, 7 Studios continued to develop Scratch without interference from its new owner, according to the company. It points out that Activision "Activision provided the fledgling developer with much needed financing during these difficult economic times."

Activision says that the lawsuit will have no impact on the release of DJ Hero, its turntable-based rhythm game planned for release later this year.