Utah Lawmakers Need $25K to Override Veto of Anti-Game BillS

The Deseret News heaps the last spadeful of dirt on the grave of Utah HB353, saying the state legislature appears unlikely to call a veto session because of, well, money.

The law would have provided people with the means to sue game retailers who advertised they were family friendly, and then were found to sell mature-rated content later. We've covered how stupid the concept was. Gov. Jon Huntsman agreed, banhammering the bill and pointing out its constitutional flaws.

But while the president of Utah's state senate thinks he could get a two-thirds majority in his chamber, he's not going to take the lead if the state house, which originated the bill, isn't pushing for a veto. And that seems to be the case. The representative who sponsored the bill sent a letter to his colleagues sticking up for the bill, but not asking explicitly for their support of an override session or their vote in it.

Because on the back end, there's a money issue. The legislature had canceled this month's "interim study day" between sessions, saving about $25,000 in costs related to convening it. Like most states, Utah is pinching every penny where it can. So if the anti-game bill is worth the fight, and it isn't, they'd have to spend the $25K just to take a vote. And then, if it succeeded, spend more taxpayer money in a constitutionally doomed defense of it.

May 11 is the deadline to call such a session. Anything can happen, but when money's involved, my bet is on the least expensive outcome.

Utah Lawmakers Unlikely to Call Override Session [Deseret News via GamePolitics]