ELSPA Introduces Traffic Light Ratings System For Stupid Parents Responding to Dr., Tanya Byron's findings that parents in the United Kingdom don't seem to be familiar with the PEGI rating symbols, the Entertainment & Leisure Software Publishers Association (ELSPA) are introducing a traffic light system, reasoning that parents know that green means go, yellow means caution, and red means stop. Obviously they've never driven in my Atlanta suburb before, where yellow means "Go faster" and red means "Oh screw it, I'm late for pilates!"
“The world of gaming is fast moving and it is vital that we have a clear ratings system that is up to date with consumers’ needs. It has already been proven that everyone understands traffic light labelling, making it the perfect scheme for the industry to adopt.”
I suppose if the bright colors fail they can always force publishers to shape the game boxes based on the ratings, forcing parents to push them through the correct hole in order to buy them. Hit the jump for a larger version of this new, possibly but not actually parent-proof system.ELSPA Introduces Traffic Light Ratings System For Stupid Parents Video Games Industry Planning to Release 'Traffic Light' Ratings System Tuesday 28th October/... In a move mirroring efforts by food manufacturers and retailers to give consumers a clear and easy way to understand food content, the games industry is close to launching a traffic light system for the ratings on video games. As the government gears up to close its consultation into video games ratings on November 20, the industry has responded to observations made by Dr Tanya Byron in her report that there is a lack of consumer awareness of the PEGI rating symbols. The industry feels the by employing a traffic light system that is simple to understand it will be effective in combating any confusion previously felt by consumers. The new system has been designed to give parents ‘at a glance’ indicators of the age appropriateness of any game’s content. An industry source said, “Video gaming is one of the UK’s best performing sectors and a rare economic success in today’s gloomy environment, with retailers announcing record profits and government ministers describing gaming as ‘the most important part of what we call the Creative Industries’. “The world of gaming is fast moving and it is vital that we have a clear ratings system that is up to date with consumers’ needs. It has already been proven that everyone understands traffic light labelling, making it the perfect scheme for the industry to adopt.”